Run Clinic

Free Run Clinic 

Thursday September 22, 201612112182_10207774195854156_9211853110703361401_n

Do you suffer from run injuries?

Does your lower back give you grief?

Is the way you run getting you hurt?

Please join us for an informative night learning about you can improve your run.
If you attended the last clinic we did in March, you know we will have plenty of laughs while we all gain important skills. Please note this is a different presentation so make sure you join us at the Henderson location this time for another addition to the series.

As if this isn’t enough incitement, we will offer light refreshments as well.

This FREE comprehensive run clinic is presented Henderson Physical Therapy clinic owner and runner Mike Russell and Coach Jackie Arcana.

Thursday September 22, 2016

6:30 -7:30 pm

Henderson Physical Therapy

1358 Paseo Verde Pkwy, # 200
Henderson, Nevada 89012

RSVP (702) 564-6712

Subscribe for training advice and updates

Informative Run Clinic

Free Run Clinic 

Thursday September 22, 201612112182_10207774195854156_9211853110703361401_n

Do you suffer run injuries?

Does your lower back give you grief?

Is the way you run getting you hurt?

Please join us for an informative night learning about you can improve your run.
If you attended the last clinic we did in March, you know we will probably plenty of laughs while we all gain important skills. However, this is a different presentation so make sure you join us at the Henderson location this time for another addition to the series.

As if this isn’t enough incitement, we will have light refreshments as well.

This FREE comprehensive run clinic is presented Henderson Physical Therapy clinic owner and runner Mike Russell and Coach Jackie Arcana.

Thursday September 22, 2016

6:30 -7:30 pm

Henderson Physical Therapy

1358 Paseo Verde Pkwy, # 200
Henderson, Nevada 89012

RSVP (702) 564-6712

 

Subscribe for training advice and updates

Running Injuries and How to Avoid Them

By John A. Mercer, Ph.D.
Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Runners get injured … anyone reading this part of the newsletter either knows this first hand or knows someone who has had a running injury. There is a wealth of research documenting the risk of injury to runner and can be summed up by considering this: If a 100 runners are followed during a marathon training program, as many as 75 will probably have some type of injury with about 20 of them having to stop running to let the injury heal.

Why is there such a high risk of injury during running? Each time your foot strikes the ground, there is an impact force of about 2-3 times your body weight. In a 30-minute run, a typical runner will have about 5000 impacts … it is the accumulation of all those impacts that are likely the root of the injury problem.

Unfortunately, no shoe design, or lack of wearing shoes, is going to solve the problem. The solution to avoiding running injuries is to avoid Too Much Change Too Soon. The body is amazing at adapting muscles and bone strength to stress like running. However, the body needs time to adapt … an injury is almost certain if too much stress is applied with too little time to adapt.

Any change in running distance, speed, surface, or shoes (new or change in model), for example, can be thought of as ‘change’ … too much of this change too soon can lead to an injury. The injury may not be immediate … which is why avoiding running injuries is so hard. Sometimes we do not realize how much stress we are placing on our bodies with a normal run … let alone a change in run in some way. Be sure to plan in your rest days and keep track of injuries … looking back on your training log you can sometimes figure out how much change in stress your body can handle.

What should a runner do when he/she is injured? This is a difficult question to answer because there are so many different types of running injuries … some of them you can continue to run with, some of them you will be better off not running and letting the body heal. Let’s say your injury is in that category … runners are notorious for going crazy if they can’t run! Here are some options: Elliptical trainer, Body weight support treadmill, and deep water running.

The Elliptical Trainer was designed to mimic the running motion while eliminating the impact with the ground. Overall, this does accomplish that … but the stride length is limited and the upper body motion is often restricted.

If you have $25,000, you can run on a Body Weight Support Treadmill. This type of treadmill ‘lifts’ the runner up to support some of the body weight. By doing that, the impact with the ground is less severe and some runners may still be able to train this way. The downside of this is that these treadmills are hard to find and are very expensive.

Another way to continue to run while injured is to run in the water. There is a good body of research that has demonstrated that runners can maintain their on-land running fitness and performance after using water running programs. There are two main categories of water locomotion: Shallow and Deep Water Running. During shallow water running, the feet are still in contact with the ground … it is a good idea to wear an old pair of shoes (or you can buy shoes specific for the pool). The downside of shallow water locomotion is that runners with certain types of injuries may not be able to place any weight on the feet.

Deep water running is down in the deep end of the pool where the runner cannot touch the bottom. Many runners will use some type of flotation device to help keep them upright so they can focus on maintaining a running motion (vs. treading water). There are several ways to ‘run’ in the water … it is a good idea to search YouTube for Deep Water Running (also known as AquaJogging). The two main styles are often described as ‘high-knee’ and ‘cross-country’. During high-knee style, your legs are moving up and down sort of like stair stepping … buy you are still trying to mimic a running motion. During cross-country, you are trying to reach forward a bit more with the leg … sort of like taking long strides. When using this style, you need to be careful that sometimes you can place too much stress on the back side of the knee when you are pulling the leg back.

In reviewing the research on training studies of deep water running, it seems the programs that are most successful are the ones that incorporate high-intensity intervals. Sorry folks … it seems you need to actually try harder in the water than you would on land to make this work! By using interval training, you can work in some high-intensity efforts with some easier efforts in order to extend the time in the water. Your high intensity efforts may only be about 10-seconds long … try to work up to 30-seconds.

In an attempt to try to avoid running injuries, you might even want to add some deep water running to your training program to supplement your on-land training. Just remember: Too Much Change Too Soon can lead to injury. Give your body a chance to adapt and it will.

Subscribe for training advice and updates

How many calories are used to run a 5K?

By John A. Mercer, Ph.D.
Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Ask this question and you’ll usually get an answer that you use more calories if you run faster … but the answer is a bit more complicated (and probably unexpected!) than that and this simple question can lead to some in depth discussion of physiology and biomechanics.

Let me give the short the answer up front … then there is the long answer below! The number of Calories to run a 5 K is the same no matter how fast you run. What does change as you run faster is the rate of Calories used … but the total amount is the same to cover a given distance.

Part of the explanation for this is that as you run faster, the time to cover a distance decreases … so even though the rate of Calories used increases, the total amount of Calories to cover a distance is the same. Really important note: This is only concerning running … the number of Calories used to cover a distance while walking is a different answer.

To calculate the number of Calories to run a distance, you need to know your body weight and the distance you ran. You can find ‘calorie calculators’ on the web really easy … here is a simple equation:

Calories = (body weight in pounds) x (distance in miles) x (0.695)
(Note: Most equations will use a constant between 0.69 and 0.80)
So, let’s say a 200 lb runner ran 3.1 miles … the total number of Calories is:
Calories = (200 lb) x (3.1 miles) x 0.695 = 431 Calories

Notice that the time to complete the 5 K does not enter the equation … if the runner ran faster, he will use Calories at a faster rate but end up using the same number of Calories overall. Let’s go the other way and talk about how fast Calories are being used.

Consider the same 200 lb runner. If he were running at 4 mph, he would be using Calories at a rate of about 9.27 Calories per minute (this is from some published data). If he ran at 6 mph, he would be using Calories at a rate of about 13.90 Calories per minute. If he runs 3.1 miles, he would take 46.5 minutes running at 4 mph and 31 minutes running at 6 mph. Let’s do some math:

Total Calories = (Rate of Calories) x (time ran)
At 4 mph: (9.27 Calories/min) x (46.5 minutes) = 431 Calories
At 6 mph: (13.90 Calories/min) x (31 minutes) = 431 Calories

The total Calories is the same! Now, there are some finer points to these calculations … and sometimes there is an adjustment to the number of Calories used based upon whether the Calories come from fat or carbohydrate … but the bottom line is that the total number of Calories is still fairly consistent for a given distance.

The rate of Calories used tells us ‘how hard’ the exercise is and increases with running speed … but the total amount of Calories used is the same for a given distance ran regardless of speed (because you cover that distance in a shorter time when you run faster).

This concept is really useful when planning out your long runs … just calculate the total number of Calories based upon distance and then be sure to take in the right amount of fuel. Also, if you want to increase the total Calories you use during running – you have to run farther (not faster).

Click here to download the complete article and “long” answer.

Subscribe for training advice and updates